Overview

Become a partner with digitalpasifik.org!

This site brings together items and collections from galleries, libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and other cultural heritage organisations or community groups that hold content or items of Pacific cultural heritage.

We want to make it easy for any institution or community group to share their stories and items with those interested in learning more about the Pacific.

We do this by accessing metadata and harvesting content that you control and manage.
We use your metadata and thumbnails to point users to content hosted on your site or system.
We aggregate this metadata and present it in via our website.

Items or collections must at minimum meet the following requirements for us to gather and present it on our site.

  • It must be digital.
  • It must be publicly available or made accessible to us.
  • It must be hosted on a stable system or site.

Participation in the digitalpasifik.org is free and means:

  • More people will discover your content and can view it alongside a network of content providers.
  • Pacific communities, students, teachers, and researchers can connect with you, your collections and the items of cultural heritage you hold.

Current partners

We’re here to connect you with our content partners who preserve and maintain digitised cultural heritage items. If you’re interested in learning more about an item, collection, or a content provider, the team can support you as you engage with them.

View our current partners here.

Becoming a Partner

Contributing content to digitalpasifik.org is in most cases a simple process that requires little effort on your behalf.

For the duration of the beta site, and as part of the partnership between National Library of Australia and National Library of New Zealand, we will be gathering data from Australian based content partners via Trove. If you are based in Australia, please engage with Trove to understand the benefits of and how to become a contributing partner. Once your data is in Trove, we gather the records that you've selected in Trove and present them here.

For those outside Australia, once you've decided you want to share your content through the digitalpasifik.org site and agreed to our metadata contribution terms, we work with you closely every step of the way to ensure you're happy with how your content is displayed on the site.

Review the content scope to see our priorities for this phase of the pilot project.

Agree to our terms of use

  • If we accept your registration of interest then we will send you a letter of participation, which explains what being a partner means and asks you to agree to the terms of use for contributing metadata.

Check how your content displays

  • Once you have agreed to participate, we will work with you on the technical options for connecting your digitalpasifik.org site.
  • We send you access to our staging website so you can assess how your content is displaying.
  • We work together to troubleshoot any issues with how your content is expressed on digitalpasifik.org
  • After you sign off on how your content is displayed on digitalpasifik.org we will share your collection on our live site and celebrate you as our newest content partner.

Get in touch with us

  • Contact us to let us know the kind of digital content you have such as images, documents, multimedia, and let’s chat about how we can best support you.

Content Scope

Content Scope

Exploring this site, you’ll find free-to-access digital images, sound files, videos, e-books and authored text like web pages and documents held by institutions and communities from around the world.

In general, we are interested in adding content to digitalpasifik.org if it is:
  • about the Pacific Island subjects, issues, or communities;
  • created in the Pacific Islands, made by a Pacific Islander or a Pacific Island community;
  • contains metadata (machine-readable content descriptions) that point to a freely accessible digital object that is not behind authentication or passwords.

We’re also keen to help those communities that are sharing their digitized content via platforms such as Youtube, Flickr, and other public sites from which we can easily gather their data. We support a wide variety of formats, and we focus on the content, not who holds it.

While many of the items we display come from established museums, libraries, galleries, archives and institutions, we believe that the voices of Pacific Island community groups, elders, indigenous knowledge experts, and cultural leaders also hold great worth, and should be presented and acknowledged accordinglyalso.

Content Priorities

We are proactively approaching and prioritising new content partners in the following areas:

  • Content created by and relating to Pacific Island communities and in chosen languages of those communities
  • Content which supports teachers and learners across the Pacific region
  • Openly licensed content that enables the reuse of Pacific Island digital content
  • Content with metadata that is available for commercial use
  • Content that is labelled with indigenous and/or traditional knowledge usage rights and licenses, that allow Pacific Island communities to determine how their recorded cultural heritage content is accessed and used when it is digitally available outside the community contexts within which it is created.

Get your content online

  • If you need help with the digitisation of your material, make use of these Make it Digital guides from digitalnz.org for digitising, describing, and managing digital content.
  • If it isn't already, get your digital material online.

Technical Options

There are a variety of different ways you can contribute your metadata to digitalpasifik.org

XML Sitemap

An XML Sitemap is a file that lists URLs for a site along with additional metadata about each URL (when it was last updated, how often it usually changes, and how important it is, relative to other URLs in the site). An XML Sitemap is quite different from the commonly known ‘sitemap’ that is for a list of pages of a website. We can set our harvester to check out your XML sitemap and pick up any new content that appears. Here is an example of what an XML site map looks like on digitalpasifik.org.

OAI-PMH

Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting is the most efficient harvest method because it can be scheduled to run regularly and automatically to pick up only new or modified records. OAI-PMH is aimed at institutional repositories containing digital content. You can learn more about OAI-PMH at http://www.openarchives.org/.

API

An Application Programming Interface puts data into a format that can be easily connected to or built upon. APIs often return a set of results in XML format which can be consumed by our harvester. Here is an example of an API that we use to harvest from the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

HTML scraping

If your records are accessible on a website but your metadata is not available through an API or sitemap our harvester may be able to scrape your metadata directly from your website. We can usually crawl your site automatically so that you don't need to be directly involved in harvesting. However, depending on your site structure, we may need you to send us a list of links or an xml file of your content. We only use this method if your site isn't updated regularly, because you will have to let us know when your site changes.

RSS feed

We can use RSS feeds for quick daily harvests of your metadata. The RSS feed needs to point to the stuff that you want us to be harvesting.

Trove

For the duration of the beta site, and as part of the partnership between National Library of Australia and National Library of New Zealand, we will be gathering data from Australian based content partners via Trove. If you are based in Australia, please engage with Trove to understand the benefits of and how to become a contributing partner. Once your data is in Trove, we gather the records that you've selected in Trove and present them here.

Welcome and warm Pasifik greetings

The information on this site has been gathered from our content partners.


The names, terms, and labels that we present on the site may contain images or voices of deceased persons and may also reflect the bias, norms, and perspective of the period of time in which they were created. We accept that these may not be appropriate today.


If you have any concerns or questions about an item, please contact us.